Didim Dentist

Treatments

Cosmetic
Veneers (Laminate)
Zircones
Bonding (White Filling)
Jewellery
Implant
Surgery

Synus Lifting

Bone Graft
Wisdom Teeth
Gingivectomy & Gingivoplasty
Apical Resection
Bleaching (Whitening)
Prosthesis
Denture
Flexible Denture
Crown
Bridge
Periodontal Treatment
Pediatric Dentistry
Root Treatment
Preventive Dentistry
Oral Hygiene
Fissure Sealent
Flossing Interdental Brushing

Bonding (White Filling)

Composite Fillings

Composite fillings are a mixture of glass or quartz filler in a resin that produces a tooth-colored filling. They are sometimes referred to as composites or filled resins. Composite fillings provide good durability and resistance to fracture in small-to-mid size restorations that need to withstand moderate chewing pressure. Less tooth structure is removed when the dentist prepares the tooth, and this may result in a smaller filling than that of an amalgam. Composites can also be "bonded" or adhesively held in a cavity.

A developed technology allows the dentist to use composite of materials to repair the damaged tooth structure White filling made from resin or porcelain is the replacement of the silver or metal color materials to make it looks more like natural.

The composite filling is used not only  for  the damaged by decay or as a result of some other harm teeth but also to replace amalgam filling in order to improve  the appearance  and gain  more strength for the tooth.

 A bonding is a composite resin that is used as an alternative to amalgams and veneers. Bondings can be used on teeth that are decayed, cracked, or stained.

Procedure

The first step is to remove the decayed or unsightly portion of the tooth. The tooth is then  etched with a liquid or gel and a bonding agent is then applied. This will allow the composite resin to be placed in the prepared tooth. The resin is then trimmed and polished.

Bonding Durability

Although composite resins are cosmetically pleasing and easily placed, their durability is not as strong as other types of restorations. These resins typically last from 4-7 years before they begin to chip and wear away. When this happens, the restoration will need to be replaced.